THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

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OneBardGooner
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby OneBardGooner » Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:20 pm

Just re-read (again) ‘Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 72’ by Hunter S Thompson. It’s his trademark crazy, yet weirdly perceptive, reportage on the 1972 American Presidential campaign which eventually saw little-known George McGovern claim the Democratic nomination and go on to get stomped by Nixon whilst the Watergate scandal unfolded.

Thompson authored four great works (Hell’s Angels; Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas; The Great Shark Hunt and Fear and Loathing ’72) and it’s this, even more so than Las Vegas, that is his greatest work.

Absolutely brilliant.
Remember reading that many moons ago - I recall (not verbatim) his description of Breakfast being: 2 Glasses of Florida's finest Orange Juice, French Croissant, Scrambled Eggs & Toast, a Pot of finest Italian Black Coffee and 2 Lines of Cocaine.

Something like that....

I recall reading Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas on my 15th Birthday (read in one sitting) and my sides were aching the next day from laughing so much - though falling down the steps whilst p*ssed outta my chunk may also have contributed.

ps: A Larger than Life Character - who really did test the limits...substance abuse wise.....Sad that he blew his own brains out in the end.... :(

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Rugby Gooner
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby Rugby Gooner » Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:02 pm

I would like to use this book thread to pay tribute to the owner of the only independent book shop in Rugby, Hunts Books, who the local newspaper, (The Rugby Advertiser), has just confirmed his passing, on 25/6/16, today.
Kelvin,(Hunt), was a great guy, book enthusiast, people enthusiast, and unfortunately a Coventry City fan! :D
He had owned and run Hunts for about 25 years, contributing to the joy of reading in our community. He even turned up at my flat a few Christmas Eves ago to deliver a couple of books that I had ordered,(he also took delivery himself of a large single malt!).
I met him a couple of times during the latter stages of his illness, but always made the point of talking about football, or books, basically anything but the cancer, because I assumed that other people were covering that issue.
He leaves a wife, Pauline, and two children, Christopher and Dominic. I think that Christopher is going to try and keep the bookshop going.
The Rugby Advertiser website has a great obituary to him.
He was a great guy and will be sadly missed. :barscarf:
Sorry to hear of his passing RG and may he rest in piece. Sounds like a gent. I love those small independent bookstores, often kept open by hard work, selflessness and pure love of reading and books. I despise the Kindle concept. A bookstore is a brilliant place to peruse books - and reading, holding an actual book is a wonderful thing. 8) As a gadget lover, it is the only area I am seriously old school about. :lol: :wink:

Do your local bookstore have a website or take postal orders because I seriously would order a few books off them just to help these last bastions of proper book appreciation stay open.
I am sure the shop probably does have a website, but will check. He was a great guy. :barscarf:
Just checked:- http://www.huntsbookshop.com
Thanks RG. 8)
Update on Hunts Bookshop.
Kelvins son has taken the helm,put posters in the windows asking people to keep his Dads legacy alive by buying/ordering books from the shop.
He has also turned the first floor of the shop into a vinyl record store.....his Dad would have loved that. :barscarf:
I have just ordered 3 books :- 2 John Higgs,(Stranger things have happened,and the K.L.F. one,and Ambrose Bearces' " The Devils Dictionary.")

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Brightonnxtround
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby Brightonnxtround » Wed Oct 05, 2016 3:58 pm

I'm a non fiction man myself at the moment I'm reading BEING MORTAL does what it says on the tin
All about what happens to the body has it ages and eventually dies how modern medicine and procedures
Have changed things over the years and not always for the better how families attitudes have changed towards the aged
Not to dipress everyone but we're all going there one day and will have to be faced buy loved ones

Fucking hell just read that back and it sounds awful but it's not . For those into this stuff it's a great read
By Atul Gawande enjoy :D :D

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DB10GOONER
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby DB10GOONER » Tue Nov 22, 2016 4:42 pm

I'm re-reading "Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer" by Stewart Evans and Paul Gainey. I first read it back in 1998 and must admit I think their suspect (an American conman and quack doctor called Francis Tumblety) is the most credible of all the many listed suspects. On second reading I am convinced they nailed it.

It's a fascinating read and does a great job of dismissing many of the myths, half-truths and urban legends that have become part of the Ripper story.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby GranadaJoe » Fri Nov 25, 2016 12:32 pm

I'm re-reading "Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer" by Stewart Evans and Paul Gainey. I first read it back in 1998 and must admit I think their suspect (an American conman and quack doctor called Francis Tumblety) is the most credible of all the many listed suspects. On second reading I am convinced they nailed it.

It's a fascinating read and does a great job of dismissing many of the myths, half-truths and urban legends that have become part of the Ripper story.

Part of the problem with all the Ripper books is that are looking to announce their findings, and therefore exhibit massive confirmation bias. It's a bit like when the police identify a suspect and look for evidence to convict them.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby DB10GOONER » Fri Nov 25, 2016 12:47 pm

I'm re-reading "Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer" by Stewart Evans and Paul Gainey. I first read it back in 1998 and must admit I think their suspect (an American conman and quack doctor called Francis Tumblety) is the most credible of all the many listed suspects. On second reading I am convinced they nailed it.

It's a fascinating read and does a great job of dismissing many of the myths, half-truths and urban legends that have become part of the Ripper story.

Part of the problem with all the Ripper books is that are looking to announce their findings, and therefore exhibit massive confirmation bias. It's a bit like when the police identify a suspect and look for evidence to convict them.
True. And most Ripper books can be discounted because of that. This book is one of the few though that actually points out both the strengths and the weaknesses of their own theory. They openly admit there is no way to ever know conclusively who Jack The Ripper was, but they do offer the most convincing evidence and suspect of all the Ripper theories I've read.

Two astonishing facts they publish that most other Ripper theorists conveniently leave out of their works (as these facts often work against their own theory for whichever named suspect they base their book on) are;

Firstly, that Tumblety was actually arrested in relation to the murders but released on bail due to a Police blunder, and then promptly disappeared - the British Police then sent detectives to America to try and re-arrest him but failed to locate him.

And secondly, a little known letter written by Detective John Littlechild, who was in effective control of CID at the time of the murders. In September 1913 he wrote a letter to journalist G. R. Sims, in which he identified Tumblety as the likely suspect.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby GoonerMuzz » Fri Nov 25, 2016 3:17 pm

Just re-read a book called Tip and Run by Edward Paice, it gives an interesting insight into the rarely mentioned war in East Africa during WW1.

Not a conflict i had any knowledge of until i read it the first time and it's worth a read if you like military history to give you an idea of WW1 beyond the usual trench warfare stuff. Definitely opens your eyes when you realise how vast an area this conflict covered and yet there were so few active participants in comparison to the fronts in Europe and the almost exact opposite conditions the soldiers in Africa had to face. Vast wars of movement in searing heat during the dry season etc

My only criticism is that there isn't for me enough depth on how bad the suffering was for the non-combatants involved like the porters but this is understandable as many of them were tribesman with very few literary skills and with no-one at the time being much interested in their views i would guess.

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Sean
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby Sean » Fri Dec 23, 2016 12:59 pm

I was shocked to hear that ex-pro John Sitton - he of the infamous Leyton Orient documentary - has finally released his book earlier this month after four years of waiting and a falling out with his ghost writer - having to refund pre-orders - that meant he had to start from scratch. Good long interview with him here. He did a load more videos with his ghost-writer who deleted them after their falling out.

He is a fascinating character who was a great youth coach and is understandably bitter at how that documentary basically ruined his football life. Interesting to note that his dad was a Gooner and he started out in the Arsenal youth team in the early 70s before moving onto Chelsea and turning pro there. He ended up playing in the third and fourth divisions for Millwall, Gillingham and Orient.

I've immediately bought the book (here) for £15. Too late for Christmas, but this may finally clear my 'reader's block' :mrgreen:

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby DB10GOONER » Wed Jan 04, 2017 9:40 am

I was shocked to hear that ex-pro John Sitton - he of the infamous Leyton Orient documentary - has finally released his book earlier this month after four years of waiting and a falling out with his ghost writer - having to refund pre-orders - that meant he had to start from scratch. Good long interview with him here. He did a load more videos with his ghost-writer who deleted them after their falling out.

He is a fascinating character who was a great youth coach and is understandably bitter at how that documentary basically ruined his football life. Interesting to note that his dad was a Gooner and he started out in the Arsenal youth team in the early 70s before moving onto Chelsea and turning pro there. He ended up playing in the third and fourth divisions for Millwall, Gillingham and Orient.

I've immediately bought the book (here) for £15. Too late for Christmas, but this may finally clear my 'reader's block' :mrgreen:
That half time team talk is one of the funniest things ever. Sitton sacked one player, called 2 others "cúnts" and threatened to fight both of them. Together. :lol: :lol: But he was diagnosed with depression if I recall?

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Sean
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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby Sean » Wed Jan 04, 2017 2:42 pm

That half time team talk is one of the funniest things ever. Sitton sacked one player, called 2 others "cúnts" and threatened to fight both of them. Together. :lol: :lol: But he was diagnosed with depression if I recall?
Just goes to show how frustrated he was with their crapness :lol:

He gave club legend Terry Howard his two-weeks notice as he was refusing to sign a contract for the same money and touting himself around other clubs. The club was near liquidation and this bloke wanted raises on his basic and bonuses as well as a £10K testimonial fund started up. Madness! He also gained nearly a stone in the space of a week and was performing badly. Naturally, the Orient supporters took Howard's side, even though he was a gambling addict who was going to greyhound racing every day.

SItton has said that offering out the players - Barry Lakin and Mark Warren - was attempting to appeal to their male pride. The 'Bring your fucking dinner' was a reference to the film 'Colors', where Robert Duvall offers out someone and tell them to 'Bring their lunch'.

It's true that he went into depression afterwards, as he was trying to get back into the game for 18 months, but no-one would return his calls or respond to his applications (I know that feeling, lol). Sitton was coaching with the FA at Lilleshall for nine years, FFS and he couldn't get another job, not even as a youth coach, which he had a talent for. He was mates with our own Neil Banfield. I'd love to see Sitts coaching at The Arsenal, but we all know TOF would never allow that.

I watched the documentary again last night. Sitton doesn't actually come over that bad. Shame it still fucked him out of a career.

As you can tell, I am fascinated about him and am glad to have started to get his side of the story for the past four years through interviews, eventually culminating in this book, which had lots of dramas even getting made.

The book arrived on Christmas Eve! So I have been reading a chapter almost every day. I am up to the part where he joins Orient as a player. It's been a good read! He does admit he was a Gooner as a kid.

I don't use Twatter that much, though I have had the occasional exchange with John. I think he even follows me now :lol: 8)

Decent article here about it. Another video here.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby officepest » Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:30 pm

Currently reading The Third Reich - A New History.
Forgot about this. Put it down for months because of its dry and, frankly, boring style and read three other books in the interim. Eventually picked it back up and finished it prior to the turn of the year.

It’s like a lecture from a knowledgeable but righteous bore which I really struggled to engage with, and it’s only because of my fascination with all aspects of the Second World War that I persisted. I cannot fault the detail and academic value of just how in-depth Burleigh’s research was in revealing much information that was hitherto unknown to me about the Nazis, but it was a real chore in places.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby officepest » Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:40 pm

Stalingrad – Antony Beevor.

Fucking brilliant. You probably all know a bit about this historic battle, in which the Soviets finally got their shit together and bled the Wehrmacht dry, but even if you do it’s still a great read. The lengths to which the Soviets went to stem the German tide (in unimaginable conditions and under extreme duress) is a testament to the remarkable strength of the human spirit. The contrast with Hitler's hubris and callous disregard for the lives of hundreds of thousands of his own soldiers who were sent to their doom and abandoned is chilling.

Highly recommended, especially if you love military history.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby DB10GOONER » Fri Feb 17, 2017 3:56 pm

Stalingrad – Antony Beevor.

Fucking brilliant. You probably all know a bit about this historic battle, in which the Soviets finally got their shit together and bled the Wehrmacht dry, but even if you do it’s still a great read. The lengths to which the Soviets went to stem the German tide (in unimaginable conditions and under extreme duress) is a testament to the remarkable strength of the human spirit. The contrast with Hitler's hubris and callous disregard for the lives of hundreds of thousands of his own soldiers who were sent to their doom and abandoned is chilling.

Highly recommended, especially if you love military history.
8) 8)

It is one of the all time greats. If you haven't read it yet then go out right now and buy his other masterpiece "Berlin: The Downfall 1945". Equal parts gripping, frightening, depressing, intriguing, engrossing, fascinating - an absolute must for all WW2 buffs. 8)

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby officepest » Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:00 pm

Ancient Gonzo Wisdom - Hunter S. Thompson.

Yet another Hunter book, my other literary passion.

This one is a collection of transcripts of interviews Hunter gave to various publications between '67 and '05, from his prime to the rather sad, self-parody caricature he became towards the end.

Probably for fans only but it gave me a good insight into a difficult, contrary and quite brilliant mind that was still as sharp as a tack by the time he painted the walls with his brain at the end of his .44 at the age of 67.

He had nothing left to say and all of his peers and friends from the 60s/70s had died, so he decided to check out on his own terms - which I kinda dig.

I still maintain that his four great works stack up against anything, written by anyone, from the 20th century.

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Re: THE GOONERSID BOOK THREAD

Postby officepest » Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:07 pm

Stalingrad – Antony Beevor.

Fucking brilliant. You probably all know a bit about this historic battle, in which the Soviets finally got their shit together and bled the Wehrmacht dry, but even if you do it’s still a great read. The lengths to which the Soviets went to stem the German tide (in unimaginable conditions and under extreme duress) is a testament to the remarkable strength of the human spirit. The contrast with Hitler's hubris and callous disregard for the lives of hundreds of thousands of his own soldiers who were sent to their doom and abandoned is chilling.

Highly recommended, especially if you love military history.
8) 8)

It is one of the all time greats. If you haven't read it yet then go out right now and buy his other masterpiece "Berlin: The Downfall 1945". Equal parts gripping, frightening, depressing, intriguing, engrossing, fascinating - an absolute must for all WW2 buffs. 8)
Already read it, DB.

Think I was slightly pissy in my comments about it a few pages back so I'll set myself straight: it too is excellent, a sort of companion piece to Stalingrad in a way, which too details one of the key sequences of events in the war with an assured, deft touch.

Beevor is a very, very talented writer.

Dunno if you might know of any similar books about Kursk/Citadel that would be worth my time? This battle (even more so than Stalingrad) signalled the death-throes of the Nazi regime but I've yet to find a definitive account.


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